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Difference between BPPV and Ménière’s Vertigo?

Discussion in 'Your Living Room' started by Brian, Nov 17, 2021.

  1. Brian

    Brian Member

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    How do doctors differentiate between the two? My vertigo episodes last between 9-12 hours, but only if I moved my head even slightly. If I keep my head perfectly still I can usually stop the vertigo.
     
  2. IvanNew

    IvanNew Active Member

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    For hearing loss and tinnitus.
     
  3. Brian

    Brian Member

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    I know but people can have hearing loss and tinnitus from loud noise too.
     
  4. IvanNew

    IvanNew Active Member

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    Obviously, but they will not have vertigo. In addition to the fact that you would know if you have been deaf by a strong exposure to noise, each person knows better than anyone the background of it.
     
  5. Kevinb003

    Kevinb003 Active Member

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    I think vertigo from menieres doesn’t improve with head positioning. At least mine never did and I am diagosed with it and not bppv.
     
  6. Brian

    Brian Member

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    As long as I keep my head totally still I can control the vertigo. I once had 5 days non stop. Also have the low frequency fluctuating hearing loss.
     
  7. Nathan

    Nathan Well-Known Member

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    It is possible to have both.

    One way to determine if you have BPPV or not, is to have a trained practitioner perform the dix-hallpike or roll test on you. This will or will not induce nystagmus, which will in turn determine if you do or do not have BPPV.

    If if this test were to return positive results, while granting your low frequency fluctuating hearing loss, that would subsequently suggest that you have both.

    I had both at one stage, because that’s how a wonderful universe works sometimes, Brain.

    Please excuse possible typos, seems I’m always in a hurry & typing from the passenger seat of a bumpy car ride on my tiny tiny iPhone with my large neanderthal fingers ugh
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Brian

    Brian Member

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    The doctor and audiologist did dix hallpike and it was negative. Does this mean my vertigo isn’t BPPV?
     
  9. Nathan

    Nathan Well-Known Member

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    It means the probability of you not having BPPV is high.
     
  10. Brian

    Brian Member

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    So I guess it is Ménière’s sadly. I have low frequency fluctuating hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, and ear fullness. Had negative ECOG test and VNG was normal. OAE test was normal too
     
  11. teesdale

    teesdale Active Member

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    Sounds like classic Menieres, Brian. Welcome to the club that nobody wants to belong to. You're fortunate to have found this forum. You potentially have a lot of trial and error ahead of you, so keep meticulous notes. Just from my personal experience I would begin with treating it as a herpes virus.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  12. Brian

    Brian Member

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    even though the Electrocochleography was normal?
     
  13. teesdale

    teesdale Active Member

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    Sorry, I don't know significance of ECOG. I'm strictly going on the big 4: hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, and fullness. Of course it's a diagnosis that will never be 100%.
     
  14. Brian

    Brian Member

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    How’s your tinnitus these days?
     
  15. teesdale

    teesdale Active Member

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    Always present, but tolerable. Thank you for asking.

    Your question prompted a google search on tinnitus and came up with this article: Tinnitus habituation: How to successfully tune out the ringing in your ears

    An exerpt is below:
    How I habituated and how you can, too
    I was personally able to habituate from severe tinnitus (caused by Meniere’s disease) with a somewhat unique, and counterintuitive strategy that involved focusing on my tinnitus during meditation.

    Because meditation is such a calming and relaxing mental exercise when practiced regularly, and because anything can be used as the focus of meditation (it doesn’t have to be your breathing or a mantra), my brain started to associate the state of relaxation with the sound of my tinnitus.

    As a result, this new reaction slowly replaced the old reaction of fear, anger, and anxiety, and I was able to fully habituate to the sound.

    And since launching my blog Rewiring Tinnitus and publishing my book of the same name to share my strategies a few years back, I’ve connected and worked one-on-one with countless sufferers who habituated and improved their quality of life with the same or a similar approach.

    But it’s certainly not the only way. There are many other strategies, such as app for tinnitus.

    In my opinion, the best way forward is to pick a strategy, stick to it for a while, and be disciplined in your approach. Because habituation can take time, regardless of how you choose to go about it.

    But it’s worth the effort, because the end result is getting your life back, and at the end of the day,
     

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