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solari

Fatigue and why you feel so tired

  1. solari

    solari MM.org Janitor Staff Member

    Admin Post
    From DizzJo on our old Meniere's forum database:

    Fatigue comes up frequently with people who have Meniere’s Disease.

    One of the suspected reasons for the fatigue is the continuous conflicting information the brain gets from the damaged balance organ in the inner ear/ears and the other parts of the balance system, the eyes and the muscles.

    In a sense both the brain and the muscles are constantly adjusting for the constantly conflicting information, which is what wears you out.

    The emotional aspect has, to some extent, to do with the constant fatigue. The fatigue makes sure that you need to rest a lot and as a result you don't accomplish nearly enough of what you want to, leaving you to feel guilty. Fatigue can also be a symptom of depression. After all there is a lot to make you feel depressed. If you aren’t getting the needed sleep, depression can also result.

    Needing to accept that you are a different person now; your capabilities have changed. Concerning fatigue, for me, it DOES make sense.

    There are some days, when I need more sleep than others and after an attack of vertigo, it may take several days, or longer to recover. You shouldn’t feel bad about the extra sleep needed. Acceptance of the changes taking place in your life is sometimes the hardest part of dealing with your disease.
     
  2. PapaJoe

    PapaJoe Member

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    I'm going to take a contrarian opinion on this one. There have been periods of months/years were my vertigo was in remission and I was steady as a rock.

    My opinion is that the fatigue and brain fog come from the immune system trying to fight inflammation that it can't properly fight. When the immune system calms down (low inflammation), my fatigue and brain fog are gone. When it's high, they're back. When it's really really high, I have to worry about vertigo.
     
  3. beachkitty

    beachkitty New Member

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    I’m going to have to side with both of you! I have been bi-lateral for 33 years now. After 9 surgeries and enough time, both of my balance nerves were totally destroyed. I see and balance with my eyes. And since I’m now deaf if one ear and partially deaf in the other, my eyes have a third job—helping me to ‘hear’. Those 3 jobs for a 1 job organ (eyes) Plus my Auto-immune easily keep me fatigued. Remission? You need to Thank God my friend. I’ve never gone into remission or silence. However, I have had the vertigo to lessen through my ‘burn-out’ stage many moons ago.

    There’s no one indicator for our fatigue. It’s a combination of each persons’ various symptoms. Acceptance is hard and has to be renewed daily. Guilt has no place in our lives but it’s almost impossible to live without it. Prayer is the answer for me. Blessings.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Robin2115

    Robin2115 New Member

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    Now that I am in stage 3 I do not feel the tiredness near as bad as I did when in stage 1 & 2. However, I have bilateral MD and I have a sensitivity so bad to loud noises that it is making my life miserable. The tinnitus is easier to deal with although it is a warning that I will have a bad day. Years ago when I would have the terrible vertigo attacks for days at a time...I would be exhausted afterwards. A tiredness like never before.
     
  5. Pupper

    Pupper Active Member

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    Anyone else care to share your thoughts or experience on fatigue. Cuz it's killing me. From 1PM to 6PM I'm so tired it's maddening.
     
  6. Clare

    Clare Active Member

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    It was explained to me that the brain has only so much bandwidth, and there is a hierarchy of messages that get through. The survival-related signals like pain and balance get through first, and logic/reasoning trails along. The brain gets exhausted having to keep tabs on balance while making sense of semi-audible conversations, which is fatiguing especially later in the day. At the same time, cognitive abilities are compromised, which is the "brain-fog" feeling. I found myself considerably less fatigued post-laby.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Philippa

    Philippa New Member

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    Nov 30, 2019
    Hi I have the same problem but I did not know that there were different stages. My Drs have not given me any information on this so I am trying to find out everything I can on my own.
     
  8. Philippa

    Philippa New Member

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    Nov 30, 2019
    I can be OK one moment and then the next moment I am so tired that I can't keep my eyes open, it is really scary when I am driving and the fatigue comes over me.
     
  9. Irishstu

    Irishstu Member

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    Apr 28, 2019
     
  10. Irishstu

    Irishstu Member

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    Apr 28, 2019
    Can you provide some info on what the stages are???
     

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