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Introduction

Discussion in 'Your Living Room' started by Jimii, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. Jimii

    Jimii Member

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    Apr 10, 2019
    First thanks for having such a great forum and everyone for sharing their stories.

    Here is my story and I'm sticking to it.

    About 18 years ago (age 32) I started having tinnitus and a buzzing reaction to sound in my right ear. Went to my primary. Nothing. Sent me to an ENT. Nothing. She sent me to UConn. Got lots of hearing tests for the next two years all the while nothing really seemed to change. Showed slight loss of hearing but no diagnosis. Before the first visit I had told my mother what was going on. She told me that my grandfather had Meniere’s. The doctor at UConn wasn’t ready to jump at the diagnosis, and really how could he. I stopped going. In the next 16 years all kinds of things happened in my right ear. I have had hundreds of short duration (less than 10 seconds) vertigo episodes. I assumed they were BPV or Meniere’s. Either way I didn’t care as it wasn’t affecting my life.

    About a month ago I had a stronger vertigo episode where I almost fell down. Again, less than 10 seconds. Two weeks ago, I realized I could no longer use the phone in my right ear. Sounded like the adults in a Peanuts TV special and very weak like 20% hearing left. Not that it mattered because it was all garbled anyway.

    Then 04/09/2019 happened. “You get blindsided at 4 pm on some idle Tuesday” as the song goes.

    Ready to leave work, I was having unstoppable vertigo, but I could still walk. Unfortunately my boss had just left, and I was alone. Stupidly, I decided to drive home. Only made it about ½ way home and I just couldn’t do it. (I know I won’t try that again.) I called my wife to come get me. Fortunately my son dropped her off, so I didn’t have to abandon the car. I couldn’t even walk to the other side of the car without help. The rest of the drive home was one of the worst experiences of my life. Had to stop once because I thought I would vomit. I was able to make though without doing that thankfully. My wife helped me to the house, I crawled to the couch and didn’t move for about 4 hours. Yesterday I stayed home, still felt funky, but not ready to drive. Worked from home, and read a lot on this website. Made an appt. at UConn next month. Back to new patient status.


    Thanks again.

    Jim
     
  2. Pupper

    Pupper Active Member

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    Oct 15, 2016
    Jimii, rough story. Interesting how Meniere's varies in people, especially its slow or fast onset. (15 years vs 3 months or less vs. totally sudden). I'm not saying you have Meniere's, just saying.

    Besides this website, here's another I always recommend. Dr. Timothy Haine's site. Affiliated with Northwestern University.

    You live in CT. I used to live there. What town?

    Meniere's Disease
     
  3. AmyLeigh

    AmyLeigh Member

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    Mar 26, 2019
    Hi Jim - welcome. I'm so sorry you had such a horrible attack. I also had my first "big" attack while driving (my two kids!) and it was terrifying. Please keep us posted on your progress, we're all cheering for you. There is a LOT of great information to be found on this forum. Thanks Pupper for sharing that other site, I will check it out too.
     
  4. Jimii

    Jimii Member

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    Apr 10, 2019
    I live in Barkhamsted. Beautiful small town and area of the state.
    Thanks for the link Pupper.

    Thanks Amy.

    I did notice my hearing came back, just not in a good way. More like 120%. Everything is so loud in that ear now. The buzzing is worse, and tinnitus is the same.
    It was weird listening to the radio on the way to work. Road noise was really load too.

    I'm very lucky to be surrounded by a great family. My wife is a PT, oldest son (22) is an ER nurse, youngest son (18) is about to finish his EMT cert. Both are still at home.

    Jim
     

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