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Vestibular Nerve Section Surgery scheduled.

Discussion in 'Your Living Room' started by Le Le, Oct 20, 2020.

  1. Le Le

    Le Le New Member

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    Oct 19, 2020
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    I am having a Vestibular Nerve Section in 3 weeks. I’ve had Meniere’s for over 30 years with horrible spinning attacks on and off. I had a fistula repair and shunt 12 years ago. In January of the dreaded 2020 I started having drop attacks. I was just sitting in a restaurant and all of a sudden it felt like someone slammed my head down and I fell over on my husband. I had another on a trip in Key West just fell to the go ground suddenly. I’ve had around 30 of them and have had three at work while with clients ( I’m a hair stylist) and even fell with scissors in my hand). No warning except lots of fullness. I haven’t driven since January because I had one while driving but was stopped at a red light and somehow was able to hold the steering wheel and break until it passed and pulled over and my husband came to get me. The attacks are like taking a ride around the moon and back in a matter of seconds and I can barely comprehend what’s happening but never pass out totally. No choice but to cut the nerve now. Has anyone else had a VNS?
     
  2. Cheryl

    Cheryl Active Member

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    I had a VNS in 1993. Even though it's been a long time ago, it's not something one forgets. Feel free to PM me if you have questions.
     
  3. Le Le

    Le Le New Member

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    I don’t know how to pm I just joined. I think I sent a message to you. Was your surgery successful? I hope I’m making the right decision.
     
  4. Autumninthefall

    Autumninthefall Active Member

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    I don't understand why you're jumping directly to a VNS? Maybe that's the only option in your situation? I just know that I had an endolymphatic sac decompression/mastoidectomy, which hardly seemed to help. A couple of years later I started with drop attacks. Like you, mine never stopped. It took a while for me to decide, but the option I was presented with was labyrinthectomy, chemical or surgical. I chose surgical. It stopped the drop attacks. I really hope you were presented with all of your options. My understanding, as explained by my doctor and other members of this forum, is that the VNS is what you do if the labyrinthectomy fails. I recommend you look at the postings on the topic by a member named, "Pupper." He details his VNS experience from start to finish. Best of Luck, Le Le.
     
  5. Le Le

    Le Le New Member

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    Thank you. They said because I have some hearing in the ear that it would be better to do the VNS to preserve the remaining hearing. I am scared though because the VNS because it’s so invasive.
     
  6. Paris 48

    Paris 48 New Member

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    Hi!So sorry that you are having those horrible drop attacks.I had one last year at the WalMart parcking lot.Dislocated my shoulder and destroyed my rotary cuff,had to have complete shoulder replacement.If I wasn`t bilateral I would have the surgery,those attacks are dangerous.Blessings and good luck!
     
  7. Cheryl

    Cheryl Active Member

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    I went directly to VNS after failed shunt surgery. My surgeon offered laby or VNS, but said he leaned towards VNS, as any hearing is worth saving because one never knows what will happen in the future. I was only 42 at the time. He said had I been a senior citizen, he would suggest a laby, as they are easier to recover from. Several years after the VNS, my Meniere's became bilateral and my first symptom in the second ear was hearing loss, which continued to decline until I have severe hearing loss in that ear. I'm glad I still have a little bit of hearing from my VNS ear, although the hearing loss is rated as profound.
     
  8. Le Le

    Le Le New Member

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    How hard was the VNS recovery?
     
  9. Cheryl

    Cheryl Active Member

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    Le Le, I sent you a couple PMs. Look up in the right corner to see if you have any alerts.
     
  10. Sarah B

    Sarah B New Member

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    I had VNS surgery in 2001 after years of attacks. I considered giving up driving, my job and riding my horse and did not like those options. It is a fairly hard surgery to recover from but in my opinion it was a great option. I was back to work within 2 months and still had balance problems but with time I have almost totally recovered my balance. By now you have probably had the surgery and are recovering. Keep a positive attitude, it isn't easy but it is worth it.
     
  11. Sarah B

    Sarah B New Member

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    VNS can save the hearing that you have. In my case I got 18 years of hearing after the VNS with a hearing aid before it was gone. I now have a bone anchored hearing aid. Given the option again I would still decide on the VNS.
     
    • Fistbump/thanks Fistbump/thanks x 1
  12. Le Le

    Le Le New Member

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    Oct 19, 2020
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    I had it done Tuesday. I’m still dizzy and very sore but I came home from the hospital yesterday because my daughter is a nurse so she can take care of me. I don’t want to stay on the pain meds too long. How long did you take them? Getting up with a walker only a couple of times a day right now.
     
  13. Arsalan

    Arsalan New Member

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    Nov 13, 2020
    Hi Le Le ! May You get well soon !
    I wanted to know, how did doctors diagnose and they prefered to You VNS? You did MRI imaging for that purpose ?
     
  14. Le Le

    Le Le New Member

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    I’ve had several MRI test done. The reason for the VNS was because my drop attacks were so bad so they decided it would be better to cut the nerve because the drop attacks can be so dangerous. Now my brain will start to adjust to having one nerve. The recovery is hard but seeing a little progress this morning on day 4 and I actually took a shower with help from my husband. I’m very whobbley but not spinning so that’s good
     
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    • Fistbump/thanks Fistbump/thanks x 1
  15. Sarah B

    Sarah B New Member

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    Mar 19, 2020
     
  16. Sarah B

    Sarah B New Member

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    Please call or text me at 5417060584 and leave a message with your email or phone number.
     
  17. Cheryl

    Cheryl Active Member

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    Congratulations, Le Le. It's just going to get better from where you are now. So happy to hear you aren't having any spinning.
     
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    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. Autumninthefall

    Autumninthefall Active Member

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    Good luck to you, Le Le! Slow and steady wins the race. Don’t get discouraged!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. Sarah B

    Sarah B New Member

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    You have taken a huge step and are on the way to an almost totally normal life. The biggest thing is that you aren't spinning! If you have any questions about things that I learned about recovery let me know.
     
  20. Todd

    Todd New Member

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    Nov 16, 2020
    Congratulations! It takes time to retrain your balance. With consistent effort you’ll get used to walking with just one ear. My VNS was life changing for me and my family.
     

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